Speaking to PeaceWorks March 1, 2020, Bette Tate-Beaver says of her work to bring groups to visit educators and students in other countries, “If we come to care about people who are like us in different spaces, it’s kind of hard to hate.”—Photos by Jim Hannah

Bette Tate-Beaver died Aug. 29

Bette Tate-Beaver, an international leader in social work and education, died of cancer Aug. 29. Through her lifetime, she fostered the beloved community envisioned by Martin Luther King Jr.

Charles Carney, in 2020, pauses during a reflection near the National Security Campus, operated by Honeywell. Carney was one of about 15 persons there demanding a change in federal budget priorities, namely, "Human Care, not Warfare!"--Photo by Tom Fox

Charles Carney begins 273-mile walk in Kansas for peace, justice, ecology  

Trumpeting a loud wake-up call about the catastrophic dangers of nuclear weapons and climate chaos, Charles Carney is walking 273 miles from McConnell Air Force Base in Wichita to the nuclear weapons plant operated by Honeywell in Kansas City, MO—the National Security Campus. The flier he is sharing with persons as he walks across Kansas, beginning … Continue reading Charles Carney begins 273-mile walk in Kansas for peace, justice, ecology  

Ron Faust, a retired Disciples of Christ minister, holds out the promise of the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons--that it comes just in time to "create life and forestall death / To breathe in hope and breathe out a future / For our grandchildren and for all human races."

A Call to Live Nuclear Free

Ron Faust sees the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons as coming just in time "to create life and forestall death / To breathe in hope and breathe out a future / For our grandchildren and for all human races."

Marchers manage the giant banner "for justice, for peace."--Photo by Mark Semet

March on KC 9/4 marks 47th anniversary of MLK’s March on Washington

The March on KC included PeaceWorks-KC leaders. “There were many denunciations of police violence and murders, many calls for the civil rights movement to be fully realized,” says Ann Suellentrop. Charles Carney highlights “the interlocking injustices” of police brutality, white supremacy, racism, and poverty.