No drone zone: At Whiteman AFB Oct. 1, drone protesters gather at the yellow/orange “no drone zone” sign warning pests not to fly drones over the base. Imagine! From left, on the ground, are Chris Overfelt of Vets for Peace, Jean Rosenthal, Brian Terrell, Jeff Stack of Mid-Missouri Fellowship of Reconciliation, Ron Faust. Standing, from left: David Kingsley, Kristin Scheer, Charles Carney, Jonne Long, Ann Suellentrop, Cris Mann, Toni Faust.—Photo by Jane Stoever

Drone protest at home of the Hellhounds

"Crimes with global consequences are being committed in this very place," says Brian Terrell in this talk he gave at the entry to Whiteman AFB Oct. 1.

Ann Suellentrop asks, “Why do we fly these colorful flags today? Because they are a sign of great hope!” They represent 66 countries that have ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Listening behind Ann are, from left, Daniel Karam, Beth Seberger, and Jon Shafer.—Photos by Jim Hannah

Recalling 1945 bombings of Hiroshima, Nagasaki

Echoes. Hope. Two hands. These came into play at our annual observance Aug. 7, “Remembering Hiroshima & Nagasaki: Never Again!”

Atsuki Mori holds up a picture of her grandmother’s fiance’s nephew, Kensuke Ueke, PhD, who lost his left eye during the bombing of Hiroshima and has devoted much of his life to seeking a nuke-free world.—Photos by Jim Hannah

Atsuki Mori talks about results of Hiroshima bombing

Atsuki Mori, from Osaka, Japan, now a nurse living in Warrensburg, MO, tells of her grandmother’s bravery and her grandmother’s fiance’s nephew who became an anti-nuke activist in ICAN.

Flags fly in KC, MO, in January 2021 for the then 51 countries (now 66 countries) that have adopted the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.—Photos by Jim Hannah

Progress on treaty to prohibit nukes; focus on universities

At an Aug. 7 gathering in KC, MO, Ann Suellentrop celebrates international advances through the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and an effort to urge universities to stop supporting the nuclear weapon industry.

Kosuke Mori-Kreiner, of Warrensburg, MO, strikes the gong for each year from 1945 to 2021 at last year’s Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance. Henry Stoever holds the gong.—Photo by Jim Hannah

Save Aug. 7 for remembering Hiroshima, Nagasaki

Please come Sunday, Aug. 7, to our PeaceWorks annual Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance. We’ll park at 6:30 pm on Prospect near Mo. Hwy. 150. We’ll take a shuttle to our 7 pm rally site, the entry to the nuclear-weapon parts plant, the KC National Security Campus, 14510 Botts Rd., Kansas City MO.

Page 1 picture for June newsletter: Jeff Humfeld holds the Vets for Peace flag during our Memorial Day rally, Prohibit Nukes, Promote HOPE.—Photo by Kriss Avery

PW newsletter makes calls to action for Earth, for peace

We call for action: Come to our Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance Aug. 7. Attend the jury trial of a nuclear weapon resister Sept. 6. Volunteer at our PeaceWorks KC Local Art Fair Sept. 24-25. And join us Oct. 1 to protest drone warfare at Whiteman AFB.

Henry Stoever, right, chats with KCPD Sgt. Craig Hope about reasons for crossing the National Security Campus property line (purple) on Memorial Day in 2021.--Photos by Tom Fox

Attend Henry Stoever’s jury trial 9/6

Stoever, who crossed the property line at the local nuke-parts plant in KC MO in 2021, was found guilty in February and sentenced to 2 years’ probation, plus fines. He appealed the decision and comes to a jury trial Sept. 6. You come too!

Moments after Tom and Kim Hoa Fox crossed a purple line marking a private entrance to the KC MO nuclear weapons manufacturing plant, the National Security Campus, guards moved in to detain them.—Photo by Jeff Davis

Why I trespassed at a nuclear weapons plant

We are moving forward building new nuclear weapons, not disarming old ones. On Memorial Day, my wife and I spoke out with our bodies. We acted for our children and grandchildren and for all the children and grandchildren of the world.

Billions for nuclear bombs? Peanuts for people? During the Memorial Day walk/rally/line-crossing, Brian Terrell, at right, checks out the banner calling for repurposing Honeywell, meaning the KC National Security Campus operated by Honeywell.—Photos by Kriss Avery

‘Unprecedented peril’ to think nuclear war is winnable

“The growing delusion among war planners that a nuclear war can be won places the world in unprecedented peril,” said Brian Terrell. “In this time of climate catastrophe, famine and pandemic, the waste of resources to build nuclear weapons is an unspeakable crime.”