Henry Stoever, right, chats with KCPD Sgt. Craig Hope about reasons for crossing the National Security Campus property line (purple) on Memorial Day in 2021.--Photos by Tom Fox

Attend Henry Stoever’s jury trial 9/6

Stoever, who crossed the property line at the local nuke-parts plant in KC MO in 2021, was found guilty in February and sentenced to 2 years’ probation, plus fines. He appealed the decision and comes to a jury trial Sept. 6. You come too!

Moments after Tom and Kim Hoa Fox crossed a purple line marking a private entrance to the KC MO nuclear weapons manufacturing plant, the National Security Campus, guards moved in to detain them.—Photo by Jeff Davis

Why I trespassed at a nuclear weapons plant

We are moving forward building new nuclear weapons, not disarming old ones. On Memorial Day, my wife and I spoke out with our bodies. We acted for our children and grandchildren and for all the children and grandchildren of the world.

Billions for nuclear bombs? Peanuts for people? During the Memorial Day walk/rally/line-crossing, Brian Terrell, at right, checks out the banner calling for repurposing Honeywell, meaning the KC National Security Campus operated by Honeywell.—Photos by Kriss Avery

‘Unprecedented peril’ to think nuclear war is winnable

“The growing delusion among war planners that a nuclear war can be won places the world in unprecedented peril,” said Brian Terrell. “In this time of climate catastrophe, famine and pandemic, the waste of resources to build nuclear weapons is an unspeakable crime.”

“The war in Afghanistan is not over,” says Brian Terrell, left, stressing the pervasive use of US drones. Terrell, who will attend the 4/30 rally at Whiteman AFB, was speaking during the peace witness at Whiteman Nov. 29, 2021.—Photo by Kriss Avery

Join peace witnesses at Whiteman AFB 4/30, at KC nuke-parts plant 5/30

These two events highlight the link between US militarism and world instability. Whether it is drone warfare or nuclear weapons, our military-industrial complex follows only one dogma, profit over safety.

"In the spring of 2021, my mind told me, 'Something has to be done,'" says Henry Stoever to colleagues before his trial. "Jim (Hannah) said, 'Do you mind if I join you?' And then Tom (Mountenay) and Brother Louis (Rodemann) and Brian (Terrell) said, 'I'd like to be in on this journey, too.'"--Among supporters in the courthouse lobby before Henry's trial 2/23/22 are, from left, Sister Theresa Maly, Debora Demeter, Jane Stoever, Daniel Karam, Ron Faust, and Mary Hladky (taking notes).--Photo by Kriss Avery; "disarm" poster by Ann Suellentrop.

Trial brief of Henry Stoever re resisting nuclear weapons

Henry Stoever was tried for crossing the property line at the local nuclear weapons plant Feb. 23. The prosecutor and judge refused to allow him to have as an exhibit his trial brief. They refused to allow him to argue the intent and purposes of his action. Here is the brief!

Courtroom, from left: Prosecutor Jesse Sendejas questions Lt. Michael Clark, standing at the podium; Judge Ardie A. Bland presides; and defendants listen (from left)—Brother Louis Rodemann, Jim Hannah, Tom Mountenay, Brian Terrell.—Sketch by Pat Marrin

Judge tells nuke resisters, ‘Continue to fight for what you believe is right’

The four defendants at the Feb. 18 trial were voluntarily arrested for trespassing May 31, 2021, at the National Security Campus, operated by Honeywell for the National Nuclear Security Administration. As one of the defendants stated the day of the trial, “Why are we on trial and not those who make these weapons?”

“I speak today to provide a witness to the hope that we will save ourselves from nuclear weapons,” Jim Hannah says to supporters in the KC MO Municipal Court lobby Feb. 18. On the left is Henry Stoever; on the right is Brian Terrell; all three crossed the property line at the KC National Security Campus May 31, 2021.—Photo and video by Kriss Avery  

“The protesters are on trial while the perpetrators are protected,” Jim Hannah tells court

“I plead my case to two higher courts for recourse—the court of global humanity, and the court of Divine justice,” Jim Hannah said Feb. 18. “Neither of these courts would find me or my co-defendants guilty for witnessing against nuclear weapons. More likely, they would judge us wanting if we had done nothing.”

Speaking of the defendants’ line-crossing at the local nuclear weapons plant site, Brian Terrell says, “What we went there for was lawful beyond a reasonable doubt.” Terrell shared this remark in the lobby of the KC MO Municipal Court before his and three other defendants’ trial for trespass.—Photo and video by Kriss Avery

‘Crimes against humanity are being committed at the NSC,” says Brian Terrell

“A secret, pervasive court,” says Brian Terrell, “must ensure above all else that the profligate and profitable production of weapons never be impeded, even at the risk of destroying all life on the planet.”