Ann Suellentrop sings Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind,” ending with Ann’s no-nuke verse, with a bow to Marvin Gaye (for “love can conquer hate"): “How many times will we escalate? / When will we learn that only love can conquer hate? / How many times must we say no to nukes / Before we take them all down? / How many years must we risk all life on Earth / Before we are all truly free? / The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind / The answer is blowin’ in the wind.”—Zoom screenshots by Kriss Avery, unless otherwise noted.

Song, sorrow, hope at heart of PeaceWorks’ Annual Meeting

“Blowin’ in the Wind” framed our sorrow about the war on Ukraine, with reflections and hope shared at the PeaceWorks Annual Meeting via Zoom.

No War with Russia over Ukraine! Our signs insist that, and drivers honk their support--at the Plaza in KC MO on Feb. 5.--Photos by Jim Hannah

KC rally seeks “No War with Russia over Ukraine”

A combo—Code Pink, Veterans for Peace, and PeaceWorks—rallied with two days’ notice, with temperatures in the 30s, with snow underfoot. We insisted: No War with Russia over Ukraine. We won honks from drivers on the Plaza, plus coverage by KCTV5.

“The moral force of the Ban Treaty is being felt,” Ann Suellentrop says at the rally for the first anniversary of the “entry into force” of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.—Photos by Jim Hannah

PeaceWorks-KC celebrates first anniversary of nuclear ban treaty

On Saturday, Jan. 22, 2022, peace-loving activists gathered to celebrate the 1st anniversary of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (the Ban Treaty) with a rally and caravan. 

“Don’t Look Away” commemorates the Ahmadi family members, seven of them children, killed by a US drone attack Aug. 29. Ann Suellentrop created the four-poster display.—Photo by Bennette Dibben

‘Don’t Look Away’—US drones regularly kill civilians throughout the world

The Ban Killer Drones campaign asked peacemakers to protest drone war on Nov. 29, and PeaceWorks-KC answered the call. Fourteen of us witnessed for peace that day at Whiteman Air Force Base near Knob Noster, Mo.

Charles Carney and Donna Constantineau, his wife, reach the end of the Peace Walk’s 253rd mile with supporters eager to celebrate.—Photo by Jane Stoever

Charles Carney completes 253-Mile Wichita-KC Peace Walk

At the rally concluding the Peace Walk, Mary Hladky poses a question from Howard Zinn: “Have we reached a point in history where we are ready to embrace a new way of living in the world, expanding not our military power, but our humanity?”