This billboard, designed by Robyn Haas, is at 71 Highway, south of 125th St. in KC, MO.

Jan. 22 rally in KC & billboards mark ban of nuclear weapons

Billboards in Kansas City, Mo., and a 2 pm rally Jan. 22 will mark the “entry into force” of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. At the rally at 47th and Main, wave the flags of 51 countries that have ratified the treaty, learn about the treaty, and sing "Imagine"--Imagine no nuclear weapons!

Brother Louis Rodemann, left, and Kristin Scheer hold their peace sign on the walking trail near the National Security Campus, where non-radioactive parts are made for nuclear weapons.--Photo by Jim Hannah.

13 display ‘Nuclear Weapons Are Illegal’ signs at KC nuclear weapons parts plant

On Nov. 12, Ann Suellentrop took four signs to PeaceWorks-KC members on the public right-of-way at 14510 Botts Road, the long entry road to the Nuclear Security Campus, where non-radioactive parts for US nuclear weapons are made. And several times she's brought the signs to the weekly witness for peace on Tuesdays, 5-6pm, at Ward Parkway and 63rd Street.

Kristin Scheer (left of center) reads a statement by Ginger Ferguson, who lost her health insurance right before the COVID crisis struck. Ferguson, 60, too ill to attend the Sept. 29 march and rally, wrote, “It shouldn't be this hard. I started paying into this system when I was 14.” At the right in the photo is Charles Carney.—Photo by Ann Suellentrop

Kansas Poor People’s Campaign demands Medicaid expansion

Dennis Russell said he gave his right eye so rich people in Kansas could become a little richer. On the night of Sept. 29, when 55 persons, including four PeaceWorks-KC leaders, marched for expanded Medicaid in Kansas, the 60-year-old Russell said he could not get the glaucoma in his right eye treated for years because he did not have health insurance. Now that he has recently obtained Kansas Medicaid, his eye doctor is telling him it is too late to repair the sight in his right eye, and he will probably never see again out of that eye.

Marchers manage the giant banner "for justice, for peace."--Photo by Mark Semet

March on KC 9/4 marks 47th anniversary of MLK’s March on Washington

The March on KC included PeaceWorks-KC leaders. “There were many denunciations of police violence and murders, many calls for the civil rights movement to be fully realized,” says Ann Suellentrop. Charles Carney highlights “the interlocking injustices” of police brutality, white supremacy, racism, and poverty.