Tulsa-King
Ashes after 1921 Tulsa race massacre vs. 1963 March on Washingtion public domain from Wikimedia Commons

Tulsa, Algeria, King, Gandhi

When African American World War I veterans with guns approached a white mob in 1921, the whites responded with massive violence. Over 30 years later, Martin Luther King, Jr., led a nonviolent movement that succeeded in expanding voting rights and open accommodations. Similarly, in the violent Algerian struggle for independence from France, 1954-1962, roughly a million out of 11 million were killed. By contrast, only a few thousand out of 350 million were killed during the nonviolent struggle for independence in India. India since has proudly been the world's largest democracy, while Algeria has struggled with autocracy and anocracy.

Charles Carney, at a PeaceWorks rally on Memorial Day in 2020, holds out hope, saying, "We're all part of this world-wide yearning for peace!"--Photo by Jim Hannah

2022 ‘Peace Is the Way’ walk, Wichita-KC

The “Peace Is the Way” walk through Kansas next year … is a walk away from the addiction of violence and fossil fuels to honoring and listening to Mother Earth. It is a walk to expand our consciousness into the reality that nuclear weapons are illegal! It is a walk to seek humility and to hear the stories of First Nation Peoples and people who were forced onto this land into the violence of slavery. 

Ron Faust, a retired Disciples of Christ minister, holds out the promise of the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons--that it comes just in time to "create life and forestall death / To breathe in hope and breathe out a future / For our grandchildren and for all human races."

A Call to Live Nuclear Free

Ron Faust sees the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons as coming just in time "to create life and forestall death / To breathe in hope and breathe out a future / For our grandchildren and for all human races."

Fran Marion at the podium, with Mayor Quinton Lucas behind her on the right and Terrance Wise behind her on the right. -Photo curtesy of Stand Up KC.

Stand Up KC caravan corrals McDonald’s

“What do we want? 15 and a union! When do we want it? Now!” This call echoed across the country, including in Kansas City, Mo. The local group Stand Up KC organized a caravan that corralled a McDonalds where their demands for $15 an hour and a union were presented.