Ron Faust, a retired Disciples of Christ minister, holds out the promise of the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons--that it comes just in time to "create life and forestall death / To breathe in hope and breathe out a future / For our grandchildren and for all human races."

A Call to Live Nuclear Free

Ron Faust sees the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons as coming just in time "to create life and forestall death / To breathe in hope and breathe out a future / For our grandchildren and for all human races."

During the Jan. 22 rally, Ann Suellentrop turns the mic to the 50-60 persons there, as they repeat after her, “The Power of Love! The Power of Justice! The Power of Soul! The Power of Truth! – that’s freeing us from nuclear weapons today!” Later, she noted, “That’s from Gandhi. It’s what satyagraha means.”—Photo by Jim Hannah

Ban Treaty: ‘the beginning of the end of nuclear weapons’

Over 2/3 of the world’s countries support the Ban Treaty (the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons) because nuclear weapons are too dangerous. They threaten all life on Earth. They do not keep us safe.

Holding forth at the microphone, David Bayard interviews one of 44 artists who exhibited at PeaceWorks’ 30th-anniversary art fair, a tradition upheld by an online presence even in a time of pandemic.

A viral attack, a virtual response: PeaceWorks’ 30th art fair goes online

2020 was shaping up as a banner year for PeaceWorks-KC’s annual art show. The number of artists exhibiting last year was the highest ever, at 130, and the pool of artists was expected to continue to grow. ... Then came the pandemic. ... "How about a virtual, online art fair?" asked David Bayard.

Ann Suellentrop speaks during last year's Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance at Loose Park. --Photo by Jim Hannah

Support ‘Back from the Brink Resolution’ to prevent nuclear war

Ann Suellentrop, during the Aug. 9 Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance online, asked us to support the “Back from the Brink Resolution” to prevent nuclear war. The resolution spells out five steps whereby the US can take the lead in this endeavor.

An aerial view of the KC, MO, National Security Campus (NSC). Jay Coghlan of NukeWatch New Mexico says the parts made in KC are meant “to completely rebuild the US nuclear weapons stockpile with new military capabilities for a new nuclear arms race.”—Photo from the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration

Jay Coghlan in video: ‘Let us … rid this world of nuclear weapons’

Jay Coghlan, in a video for PeaceWorks-KC in early August, fired away at KC’s nuclear weapon production plant. He challenged, “let us unite in a moral and political effort to rid this world of nuclear weapons and to use the sad occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing to begin just that very work.”