A protester holds a Russian passport and a poster with words, “I am Russian and I oppose the war” during the human chain against the killing of children by the Russian army during the invasion of Ukraine. (Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images, 1240556861.jpeg.webp)

To end the horror in Ukraine, go big, and go broad

“Amid such suffering and with the risk of escalation increasing by the day, our call must be clear: End the war now,” says Kevin Martin, president of Peace Action, the network to which PeaceWorks belongs.

“The war in Afghanistan is not over,” says Brian Terrell, left, stressing the pervasive use of US drones. Terrell, who will attend the 4/30 rally at Whiteman AFB, was speaking during the peace witness at Whiteman Nov. 29, 2021.—Photo by Kriss Avery

Join peace witnesses at Whiteman AFB 4/30, at KC nuke-parts plant 5/30

These two events highlight the link between US militarism and world instability. Whether it is drone warfare or nuclear weapons, our military-industrial complex follows only one dogma, profit over safety.

Ann Suellentrop sings Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind,” ending with Ann’s no-nuke verse, with a bow to Marvin Gaye (for “love can conquer hate"): “How many times will we escalate? / When will we learn that only love can conquer hate? / How many times must we say no to nukes / Before we take them all down? / How many years must we risk all life on Earth / Before we are all truly free? / The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind / The answer is blowin’ in the wind.”—Zoom screenshots by Kriss Avery, unless otherwise noted.

Song, sorrow, hope at heart of PeaceWorks’ Annual Meeting

“Blowin’ in the Wind” framed our sorrow about the war on Ukraine, with reflections and hope shared at the PeaceWorks Annual Meeting via Zoom.