During the Aug. 7 event Remembering Hiroshima & Nagasaki, Ron Faust reads the words of Takato Michishita, a hibakusha, a survivor of one of the 1945 blasts, who wrote to young people, "If you sense (war) coming, it may be too late."--Photo by Jim Hannah

Knotty Karma

Ron Faust, poet, heard Japanese-Americans say on Aug. 7, “We should never build another nuclear weapon.” He wrote a warning: “As long as we are stuck (with the world having 13,000 nukes), We will shorten the time of the Doomsday Clock.”

Ann Suellentrop asks, “Why do we fly these colorful flags today? Because they are a sign of great hope!” They represent 66 countries that have ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Listening behind Ann are, from left, Daniel Karam, Beth Seberger, and Jon Shafer.—Photos by Jim Hannah

Recalling 1945 bombings of Hiroshima, Nagasaki

Echoes. Hope. Two hands. These came into play at our annual observance Aug. 7, “Remembering Hiroshima & Nagasaki: Never Again!”

Atsuki Mori holds up a picture of her grandmother’s fiance’s nephew, Kensuke Ueke, PhD, who lost his left eye during the bombing of Hiroshima and has devoted much of his life to seeking a nuke-free world.—Photos by Jim Hannah

Atsuki Mori talks about results of Hiroshima bombing

Atsuki Mori, from Osaka, Japan, now a nurse living in Warrensburg, MO, tells of her grandmother’s bravery and her grandmother’s fiance’s nephew who became an anti-nuke activist in ICAN.

Flags fly in KC, MO, in January 2021 for the then 51 countries (now 66 countries) that have adopted the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.—Photos by Jim Hannah

Progress on treaty to prohibit nukes; focus on universities

At an Aug. 7 gathering in KC, MO, Ann Suellentrop celebrates international advances through the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and an effort to urge universities to stop supporting the nuclear weapon industry.

Parties to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons - history and forecast

Ask our members of Congress to join the TPNW

What's the single most important thing we can do to reduce the risk of nuclear Armageddon? My answer: Ask our representatives in the US Congress to join the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Kosuke Mori-Kreiner, of Warrensburg, MO, strikes the gong for each year from 1945 to 2021 at last year’s Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance. Henry Stoever holds the gong.—Photo by Jim Hannah

Save Aug. 7 for remembering Hiroshima, Nagasaki

Please come Sunday, Aug. 7, to our PeaceWorks annual Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance. We’ll park at 6:30 pm on Prospect near Mo. Hwy. 150. We’ll take a shuttle to our 7 pm rally site, the entry to the nuclear-weapon parts plant, the KC National Security Campus, 14510 Botts Rd., Kansas City MO.