At the end of the largest-ever PeaceWorks Memorial Day march for freedom from nuclear weapons, Jim Hannah, left, walked backwards across the property line for the nuke-parts plant to indicate his objection to weapons of omnicide.--Photos by Mark A. Semet

Ninth Memorial Day peace witness draws its largest crowd

In a rebuke to White House attempts to “make America nuclear again,” 17 peace activists were arrested for trespass during the ninth annual Memorial Day peace witness for a nuclear weapons-free world.

Sunny Jordan Hamrick tells supporters before the Dec. 7 trial in Kansas City, Mo., on his and others’ resistance to nuclear weapons, “No matter how much work we do in our communities, no matter how many mouths we feed, or homes we repair, and no matter how much Love we share, it could all be taken away in seconds because of these weapons, because of the lust for power. So today, as we walk into the courtroom, we take a few steps in the direction of truth, just as we did on Memorial Day.”—Photo by Jeremy Ruzich

Nukes on trial: tables are turned—after case is dismissed, defendants call nukes guilty of crimes against humanity

The Dec. 7 hearing at the Kansas City, Mo., Municipal Court was dubbed “Nukes on Trial,” but there was no trial because the lone witness for the prosecution did not come to court; no one appeared to testify against the five defendants’ act of civil disobedience. Nonetheless, nuclear weapons were tried and found guilty as the defendants held their own court after the judge dismissed the trespass charge.

Turning Back the Doomsday Clock

Question: What do ancient sorcerers, necromancers, and conjurers have in common with present-day nuclear weapons proponents? Answer: All four pursue the misguided and magical belief that they are conjuring up helpful servants, when in reality they are summoning up destructive demons. Peter Lumsdaine, a researcher and peace activist, shared this analysis, plus threads of hope, during his talk sponsored by PeaceWorks-KC July 6.

Ann Suellentrop joins Büchel, Germany, protest vs. US nukes at military base there

Joining passionate peace activists in Germany this summer, Ann Suellentrop, a Board member of PeaceWorks-KC, is helping protest the 20 US nuclear weapons at the Büchel, Germany, Air Force Base. Across the road from the base, the pacifists set up a camp each year and conduct 20 weeks of protests at the base entry—one week for each bomb. Ann gave three talks in June, played “We Shall Overcome” and “When the Saints Go Marching In” on her clarinet, and shared stories of US protests against increased funding for nuclear weapons.