Sahj Kaya plays the prosecuting attorney and Tammy Brown the judge in the "Putting Nukes on Trial in KC" play. Photo by Jim Hannah.

Video splurge from PeaceWorks’ Annual Meeting

The array of videos from PeaceWorks-KC’s Annual Meeting March 1 includes these gems, produced by Mark and Jenny Semet Videography. The first video is of Sunny Hamrick opening the meeting. The second has Ann Suellentrop's encouragement to read the book Warheads to Windmills: How to Pay for the Green New Deal. The other videos come from the play "Nukes on Trial in KC." Incredible witness!

"The peace movement, sometimes as small as 17 nonviolent line-crossers, is the fourth line of defense against the three government branches, which all have a high degree of militarism. The peace movement is democracy without militarism," says Ron Faust. Photo by Jim Hannah.

Get glimpses of PeaceWorks’ 3/1 Annual Meeting

The PeaceWorks-KC Annual Meeting was rich with meaning and memories. PeaceWorks leaders recalled events of the past year; a play explored reasons for resisting the making of parts for nuclear weapons in KC, MO. The pictures and podcast give you a taste of our Annual Meeting March 1.

Line-crossers and supporters gather outside Municipal Court before the Nov. 1 trial.—Photo by Jeremy Ruzich

Guilty: 15 activists in KC seeking a nuclear-weapon-free world

On Nov. 1, in the Kansas City, Mo., Municipal Court, 15 peace activists, in an act of nonviolent civil resistance, were found guilty of trespassing at the National Security Campus in Kansas City, Mo. The NSC plant is where 85 percent of the non-nuclear parts are manufactured or procured for the U.S. nuclear arsenal. The peace activists, insisting that nuclear weapons are illegal, immoral, and threaten all life, crossed the “property line” at the plant after a PeaceWorks-KC rally. The line-crossers were arrested on Memorial Day, May 27, to heighten awareness to the dangers of producing nuclear weapons—many workers at KC’s former nuke-parts plant have died.

Photo by Jim Hannah

Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance marks 74th anniversary of bombings

Remembering the two atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, 55 persons shared potluck, listened to speakers, and were moved by the singing of Bob and Diana Suckiel. Atsuki Mori explained that her grandmother’s whole life dramatically changed after the Hiroshima bombing and recalled how much her family and the Japanese people have suffered.

At the end of the largest-ever PeaceWorks Memorial Day march for freedom from nuclear weapons, Jim Hannah, left, walked backwards across the property line for the nuke-parts plant to indicate his objection to weapons of omnicide.--Photos by Mark A. Semet

Ninth Memorial Day peace witness draws its largest crowd

In a rebuke to White House attempts to “make America nuclear again,” 17 peace activists were arrested for trespass during the ninth annual Memorial Day peace witness for a nuclear weapons-free world.

Brad Grabs, (Winner of the Cheatum Award), Jane Stoever & Spencer Graves

Harsh reality met hope at PeaceWorks’ Annual Meeting

Speakers assailed contaminants at the former nuclear weapons parts plant and the fear of toxins at the new plant, and they welcomed plans to address the racial divide in KC as well as looming threats to our earth, air, and water. Annual Meeting blends harsh reality, hope Harsh reality met bold hope at the PeaceWorks … Continue reading Harsh reality met hope at PeaceWorks’ Annual Meeting

Art by Mark Bartholomew

Here’s an arresting idea to make your next Memorial Day more memorable …

Sign-up has already begun for persons willing to risk arrest Memorial Day, May 27, for “crossing the line” in nonviolent civil disobedience at the new nuclear weapons plant in south Kansas City. Three peace witnesses from Europe plan to join the resistance, in company with local PWKC repeat arrestees Lu Mountenay and Jim Hannah.