Brother Louis Rodemann, left, and Kristin Scheer hold their peace sign on the walking trail near the National Security Campus, where non-radioactive parts are made for nuclear weapons.--Photo by Jim Hannah.

13 display ‘Nuclear Weapons Are Illegal’ signs at KC nuclear weapons parts plant

On Nov. 12, Ann Suellentrop took four signs to PeaceWorks-KC members on the public right-of-way at 14510 Botts Road, the long entry road to the Nuclear Security Campus, where non-radioactive parts for US nuclear weapons are made. And several times she's brought the signs to the weekly witness for peace on Tuesdays, 5-6pm, at Ward Parkway and 63rd Street.

Kristin Scheer (left of center) reads a statement by Ginger Ferguson, who lost her health insurance right before the COVID crisis struck. Ferguson, 60, too ill to attend the Sept. 29 march and rally, wrote, “It shouldn't be this hard. I started paying into this system when I was 14.” At the right in the photo is Charles Carney.—Photo by Ann Suellentrop

Kansas Poor People’s Campaign demands Medicaid expansion

Dennis Russell said he gave his right eye so rich people in Kansas could become a little richer. On the night of Sept. 29, when 55 persons, including four PeaceWorks-KC leaders, marched for expanded Medicaid in Kansas, the 60-year-old Russell said he could not get the glaucoma in his right eye treated for years because he did not have health insurance. Now that he has recently obtained Kansas Medicaid, his eye doctor is telling him it is too late to repair the sight in his right eye, and he will probably never see again out of that eye.

Marchers manage the giant banner "for justice, for peace."--Photo by Mark Semet

March on KC 9/4 marks 47th anniversary of MLK’s March on Washington

The March on KC included PeaceWorks-KC leaders. “There were many denunciations of police violence and murders, many calls for the civil rights movement to be fully realized,” says Ann Suellentrop. Charles Carney highlights “the interlocking injustices” of police brutality, white supremacy, racism, and poverty.

Ann Suellentrop speaks during last year's Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance at Loose Park. --Photo by Jim Hannah

Support ‘Back from the Brink Resolution’ to prevent nuclear war

Ann Suellentrop, during the Aug. 9 Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance online, asked us to support the “Back from the Brink Resolution” to prevent nuclear war. The resolution spells out five steps whereby the US can take the lead in this endeavor.

Victor Dougherty

PeaceWorks-KC hosts its first Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance online

The novel COVID-19 virus resulted in a novel Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance by PeaceWorks-KC Aug. 9. The annual event took place for the first time not outdoors but online. Victor Dougherty reflected on the Buddhist saying, “As long as there is war within, there will be war without.” Victor led the Zoom attendees in blessings for themselves, for others difficult to embrace, and for the entire world.

Online, observe 75th anniversary of Hiroshima/Nagasaki bombings and seek to ‘be peace’

PeaceWorks-KC’s annual Hiroshima/Nagasaki remembrance will be held this year online on Sunday, Aug. 9, at 7pm. We’ll have speakers, video, and art. We invite you to make a “ribbon,” part of The Ribbon International, from fabric you fold to about 1 yard x ½ yard and decorate to answer this question: What can I not bear to think of as lost forever in a nuclear war, or any war or environmental disaster?

Cris Mann, a recently retired special-education teacher, urges, “We should cancel college debt and eliminate the warfare budgets.” She led a chant: “Books, not bombs!”--Photos by Jim Hannah

‘Human Care, Not Warfare’ makes it to the media

KKFI Community Radio (90.1 FM) and NBC Action News (Channel 41) covered the May 25 “Human Care, Not Warfare” midtown rally. Among 12 speakers, Cris Mann urged, “We should cancel college debt and eliminate the warfare budgets.” She led a chant: “Books, not bombs!”