Kara Springer, A Small Matter of Engineering, Part II, 2016. Photo: Conrad Benner.

What white people can do for racial justice

Work on ensuring that Black educators are hired where Black children are taught. Work with your HR department to recruit Americans who are descendants of enslaved Africans. Donate to anti-white-supremacy work. Support Black businesses. Bank Black. These are a few of the actions white persons can take for racial justice, as recommended by Corinne Shutack.

“We’re all part of this worldwide yearning for peace!” Charles Carney tells 20 nuke protesters near the National Security Campus May 25.—Photo by Tom Fox

Carney takes hope from ‘everyday people creating a new narrative’

“We’re living in very dark times,” Charles Carney told 20 persons at the entry to the new nuclear weapon parts plant in Kansas City, Mo. “It’s easy to forget this grassroots movement.”

“The United States of America spends over a trillion dollars a year on war, but lacks the political will to save the lives of its own citizens,” says Christopher Overfelt.—Photo by Jim Hannah

Christopher Overfelt, of Vets for Peace, calls for health care for all

Christopher Overfelt shared his VA health care story during the rally “Human Care, Not Warfare” May 25. Saying his care has been “top-notch,” Overfelt charged, “To think that we have the capability to provide this level of care to all Americans, but lack only the political will to make it happen, is a travesty.”

Cris Mann, a recently retired special-education teacher, urges, “We should cancel college debt and eliminate the warfare budgets.” She led a chant: “Books, not bombs!”--Photos by Jim Hannah

‘Human Care, Not Warfare’ makes it to the media

KKFI Community Radio (90.1 FM) and NBC Action News (Channel 41) covered the May 25 “Human Care, Not Warfare” midtown rally. Among 12 speakers, Cris Mann urged, “We should cancel college debt and eliminate the warfare budgets.” She led a chant: “Books, not bombs!”

Bennette Dibben puts a “Human Care, Not Warfare” sign on Sharon Hannah’s mask.—Photos by Jim Hannah

CARE-a-vans, rallies seek ‘Human Care, Not Warfare’

A pandemic pivot from funding war and weapons to caring for humanity and Earth—that was the aim of “Human Care, Not Warfare" on Memorial Day, May 25 in Kansas City, Mo. PeaceWorks-KC Board members and leaders from several other groups spoke out and CARE-a-vanned two days before the nation’s death toll from COVID-19 reached 100,000.