Everyday Racism

I'm writing this because my wife posted some instances of Racism she has seen me go through since we have been together in this house on the Southside of St. Louis. Those are just a couple of the things I told her about, because the other things were everyday Racism that just bounce off of me. I don’t want to have her living in fear that one day I might not come home.

Kara Springer, A Small Matter of Engineering, Part II, 2016. Photo: Conrad Benner.

What white people can do for racial justice

Work on ensuring that Black educators are hired where Black children are taught. Work with your HR department to recruit Americans who are descendants of enslaved Africans. Donate to anti-white-supremacy work. Support Black businesses. Bank Black. These are a few of the actions white persons can take for racial justice, as recommended by Corinne Shutack.

Choking Racism

Ron Faust, a former Disciples of Christ minister, wrote this poem May 31 on the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis by police May 25. Faust’s poem begins: It was so visible, so wrong/In contrast to the death snarl/Of an invisible pandemic attack When an officer pressed the wind pipe/Of George Floyd to his death Even after he pleaded, “I can’t breathe”/Which took the whole world’s breath away

Captive audience listens to the panel. Photo by Mark Semet

‘Race Issues ARE Peace Issues’—program disrupts apathy

Peace activists gathered April 27 for a panel discussion and workshops on the theme “Race Issues ARE Peace Issues.” Sponsored by PeaceWorks-KC and moderated by Lucky Garcia, the event was designed to foster networking among local peace activists to more effectively address racism and violence in greater Kansas City.

Senseless killing, sensible response

The irony that the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh became the scene of multiple shooting deaths on a peaceful Sabbath morning is a senseless contradiction, difficult to take in. We at PeaceWorks, Kansas City, join the nation in grief for the victims of the Oct. 27 massacre and their loved ones.

Learn, Move, Act: Justice for Immigrants

“This summer has witnessed a reckoning for U.S. political and social life, a rending tension of fear and exclusion for humans who have immigrated more recently, without legal documentation, to this culture. While the policies of immigration law have, throughout the national history, always sought to exclude, there is an especially violent escalation in the current moment of federal orders and actions. Offering welcome, refuge, and mercy all become the work of peace,” says Joseph Wun.