“We’re all part of this worldwide yearning for peace!” Charles Carney tells 20 nuke protesters near the National Security Campus May 25.—Photo by Tom Fox

Carney takes hope from ‘everyday people creating a new narrative’

“We’re living in very dark times,” Charles Carney told 20 persons at the entry to the new nuclear weapon parts plant in Kansas City, Mo. “It’s easy to forget this grassroots movement.”

“The United States of America spends over a trillion dollars a year on war, but lacks the political will to save the lives of its own citizens,” says Christopher Overfelt.—Photo by Jim Hannah

Christopher Overfelt, of Vets for Peace, calls for health care for all

Christopher Overfelt shared his VA health care story during the rally “Human Care, Not Warfare” May 25. Saying his care has been “top-notch,” Overfelt charged, “To think that we have the capability to provide this level of care to all Americans, but lack only the political will to make it happen, is a travesty.”

Bennette Dibben puts a “Human Care, Not Warfare” sign on Sharon Hannah’s mask.—Photos by Jim Hannah

CARE-a-vans, rallies seek ‘Human Care, Not Warfare’

A pandemic pivot from funding war and weapons to caring for humanity and Earth—that was the aim of “Human Care, Not Warfare" on Memorial Day, May 25 in Kansas City, Mo. PeaceWorks-KC Board members and leaders from several other groups spoke out and CARE-a-vanned two days before the nation’s death toll from COVID-19 reached 100,000.

Artwork by Bennette Dibben.

Memorial Day rally/CARE-a-van: Pandemic pivot from warfare to human care

Seeking a "pandemic pivot," PeaceWorks-KC and other groups will call for a shift from militarism to humanitarianism. The CARE-a-van will assemble at 30th Street and Harrison in KC MO at 9:30 a.m. Memorial Day, May 25, and proceed to 3800 Troost, St. Mark Hope and Peace Church parking lot for a rally at 10 a.m. Some drivers will bring the CARE-a-van to the nuclear weapons factory in KC MO; some will CARE-a-van in midtown.