"Just as the threat of the new coronavirus must be met by cooperation, common-sense and solidarity among peoples and nations," write the authors, "so must the danger of a nuclear war." (Photo: CC)

The novel coronavirus and nuclear weapons

Pondering the coronavirus epidemic and nuclear weapons, two champions of peace highlight the danger nuclear weapons pose, saying, “Humankind cannot remain oblivious of this persisting danger to its own survival.” They sum up efforts to abolish nuclear weapons: “As with viruses, containment may be good, but eradication is best.” This article is reprinted from Common Dreams.

Sahj Kaya plays the prosecuting attorney and Tammy Brown the judge in the "Putting Nukes on Trial in KC" play. Photo by Jim Hannah.

Video splurge from PeaceWorks’ Annual Meeting

The array of videos from PeaceWorks-KC’s Annual Meeting March 1 includes these gems, produced by Mark and Jenny Semet Videography. The first video is of Sunny Hamrick opening the meeting. The second has Ann Suellentrop's encouragement to read the book Warheads to Windmills: How to Pay for the Green New Deal. The other videos come from the play "Nukes on Trial in KC." Incredible witness!

"The peace movement, sometimes as small as 17 nonviolent line-crossers, is the fourth line of defense against the three government branches, which all have a high degree of militarism. The peace movement is democracy without militarism," says Ron Faust. Photo by Jim Hannah.

Get glimpses of PeaceWorks’ 3/1 Annual Meeting

The PeaceWorks-KC Annual Meeting was rich with meaning and memories. PeaceWorks leaders recalled events of the past year; a play explored reasons for resisting the making of parts for nuclear weapons in KC, MO. The pictures and podcast give you a taste of our Annual Meeting March 1.

Attorney Henry Stoever stands at left with most of the defendants for the Nov. 1 trial.--Photo by Jeremy Ruzich

Trial brief supports defendants’ line-crossing at nuclear weapons parts plant

Defense attorney Henry Stoever submitted a 19-page legal brief Oct. 23 for the Nov. 1 trial; the 15 defendants had crossed a property line at the nuclear weapons parts plant in Kansas City, Mo. Stoever says in the brief, “Where defendants know even a limited exchange of nuclear weapons would cause irreparable harm to our planet, then the defendants assert … that they are exercising their constitutional rights and privileges to protect this very precious U.S. Constitution.”

Chris Rhink and Lois Swimmer are among about 90 persons at the May 27 peace witness. Photo by Mark Semet.

Putting nukes on trial, 15 line-crossers at a nuke-parts plant receive guilty verdict

The Kansas City, Mo., Municipal Court trial Nov. 1, 2019, put nuclear weapons on trial. The fifteen defendants had crossed the property line at the local nuclear weapons parts plant, and each spoke about the need to take that action to call for a nuke-free world. For example, Jim Hannah admitted it breaks the law to cross the property line at the nuke-parts plant. He added, “At one time, slavery was the law, and my ancestors broke the law. I believe there’s a higher law concerning these destructive weapons.”

Line-crossers and supporters gather outside Municipal Court before the Nov. 1 trial.—Photo by Jeremy Ruzich

Guilty: 15 activists in KC seeking a nuclear-weapon-free world

On Nov. 1, in the Kansas City, Mo., Municipal Court, 15 peace activists, in an act of nonviolent civil resistance, were found guilty of trespassing at the National Security Campus in Kansas City, Mo. The NSC plant is where 85 percent of the non-nuclear parts are manufactured or procured for the U.S. nuclear arsenal. The peace activists, insisting that nuclear weapons are illegal, immoral, and threaten all life, crossed the “property line” at the plant after a PeaceWorks-KC rally. The line-crossers were arrested on Memorial Day, May 27, to heighten awareness to the dangers of producing nuclear weapons—many workers at KC’s former nuke-parts plant have died.

Byron Clemens, second from right, after leaving court and a restaurant, with (from left) Henry and Jane Stoever and Chrissy Kirchhoefer.—Photo courtesy of PeaceWorks-KC

Byron Clemens comes to trial Sept. 5 in KC for ‘trespassing’ at nuke-parts plant

Byron Clemens gained “diversion” instead of a stiffer sentence Sept. 5 in the Kansas City, Mo., Municipal Court. He was charged with trespassing July 4 at KC’s National Security Campus (NSC), where 85 percent of the non-nuclear parts for US nuclear weapons are made or procured.