Photo by Jim Hannah

Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance marks 74th anniversary of bombings

Remembering the two atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, 55 persons shared potluck, listened to speakers, and were moved by the singing of Bob and Diana Suckiel. Atsuki Mori explained that her grandmother’s whole life dramatically changed after the Hiroshima bombing and recalled how much her family and the Japanese people have suffered.

Suzanna van der Hijden of Amsterdam, left, and Bennette Dibben kick back at a restaurant after the line-crossing for peace on May 27. Why the hat? Dibben fashioned dandelions for her straw hat in honor of Lu Mountenay, who said in 2018 that the four men crossing the line with her were thorns in the side of militarism. Mountenay called herself a weed, a dandelion, saying, “Hear me roar: No more nukes!” as the five crossed the line. Mountenay was much on Dibben’s mind this Memorial Day.—Photo by Jane Stoever

Nov. 1: Trial for 17 who crossed nuke-plant property line on Memorial Day

A judge set the date of Nov. 1 for the trial of 17 persons who crossed the property line at the nuclear weapons parts plant in Kansas City, Mo., on May 27. At 12:30pm, an hour before the trial time, all are invited to share reflections at the courthouse entry, 511 E. 11th St., in KC.

Byron Clemens, left, displays his police report in Kansas City Aug. 5, standing outside Municipal Court with supporters Christian Brother Louis Rodemann and Chrissy Kirchhoefer.—Photo by Jane Stoever

Byron Clemens comes to trial Sept. 5 in KC for ‘trespassing’ at nuke-parts plant

Byron Clemens accompanied famed Plowshares activist Father Carl Kabat July 4 when Kabat splashed red paint on the National Security Campus entry sign. Kabat, 85, moved to the Order of Mary Immaculate retirement center in San Antonio July 15. Clemens came to court Aug. 5 and received a court date of Sept. 5 at Municipal Court in Kansas City, Mo. Clemens says he supported Kabat’s efforts “to stop the insanity of nuclear weapons.”

Ann Suellentrop (left), Cassie Weck, and Spencer Graves catch a quiet moment before visiting congressional offices.

Make more plutonium pits per year? Who wants them?

Three PeaceWorks representatives lobbied Congress during DC Days May 20-22, sponsored by the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability (ANA). They learned the Trump administration plans production of more plutonium pits—the cores of modern thermonuclear weapons—with help from KC’s nuclear weapon parts plant.

Theresa Maly carrying message of truth. Photo by Mark Semet.

Short videos carry message of Memorial Day peace witness

Here are a number of videos—some a few seconds long, some a few minutes long—sharing reflections from the May 27 Memorial Day Witness for a Nuke-Free World in Kansas City, Mo. Many of the speakers were standing near the entry road to KC’s new nuclear weapons parts plant before they crossed the line onto the plant’s property and were arrested.

At the end of the largest-ever PeaceWorks Memorial Day march for freedom from nuclear weapons, Jim Hannah, left, walked backwards across the property line for the nuke-parts plant to indicate his objection to weapons of omnicide.--Photos by Mark A. Semet

Ninth Memorial Day peace witness draws its largest crowd

In a rebuke to White House attempts to “make America nuclear again,” 17 peace activists were arrested for trespass during the ninth annual Memorial Day peace witness for a nuclear weapons-free world.

During the peace march, Jim Hannah carries the Earth as seen from the Moon, and Addy Simpson carries a peace flag made by her grandmother Lu Mountenay.—Photos by Mark A. Semet

‘March with disarmed hearts … toward nuclear Freedom Land!’

Jim Hannah shared this statement at the start of the 1-mile walk on the public trail past the new nuclear weapons parts plant in south KC. “We’re not here just to resist and protest and oppose. We are here to lift up an ensign of hope for a world of justice and peace,” Hannah told about 70 marchers.