--Chart by Spencer Graves

UN Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons needs only 6 more signers to ‘enter into force’

The UN treaty will enter into force 90 days after the 50th instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval, or accession has been deposited at the UN. We need only 6 more. As of Aug. 12, I estimate the 50th signing onto the treaty may occur Jan. 8, 2021. If that happens, the treaty will take effect April 8, 2021.

Ann Suellentrop speaks during last year's Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance at Loose Park. --Photo by Jim Hannah

Support ‘Back from the Brink Resolution’ to prevent nuclear war

Ann Suellentrop, during the Aug. 9 Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance online, asked us to support the “Back from the Brink Resolution” to prevent nuclear war. The resolution spells out five steps whereby the US can take the lead in this endeavor.

An aerial view of the KC, MO, National Security Campus (NSC). Jay Coghlan of NukeWatch New Mexico says the parts made in KC are meant “to completely rebuild the US nuclear weapons stockpile with new military capabilities for a new nuclear arms race.”—Photo from the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration

Jay Coghlan in video: ‘Let us … rid this world of nuclear weapons’

Jay Coghlan, in a video for PeaceWorks-KC in early August, fired away at KC’s nuclear weapon production plant. He challenged, “let us unite in a moral and political effort to rid this world of nuclear weapons and to use the sad occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing to begin just that very work.”

Victor Dougherty

PeaceWorks-KC hosts its first Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance online

The novel COVID-19 virus resulted in a novel Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance by PeaceWorks-KC Aug. 9. The annual event took place for the first time not outdoors but online. Victor Dougherty reflected on the Buddhist saying, “As long as there is war within, there will be war without.” Victor led the Zoom attendees in blessings for themselves, for others difficult to embrace, and for the entire world.

“We’re all part of this worldwide yearning for peace!” Charles Carney tells 20 nuke protesters near the National Security Campus May 25.—Photo by Tom Fox

Carney takes hope from ‘everyday people creating a new narrative’

“We’re living in very dark times,” Charles Carney told 20 persons at the entry to the new nuclear weapon parts plant in Kansas City, Mo. “It’s easy to forget this grassroots movement.”

“The United States of America spends over a trillion dollars a year on war, but lacks the political will to save the lives of its own citizens,” says Christopher Overfelt.—Photo by Jim Hannah

Christopher Overfelt, of Vets for Peace, calls for health care for all

Christopher Overfelt shared his VA health care story during the rally “Human Care, Not Warfare” May 25. Saying his care has been “top-notch,” Overfelt charged, “To think that we have the capability to provide this level of care to all Americans, but lack only the political will to make it happen, is a travesty.”

Cris Mann, a recently retired special-education teacher, urges, “We should cancel college debt and eliminate the warfare budgets.” She led a chant: “Books, not bombs!”--Photos by Jim Hannah

‘Human Care, Not Warfare’ makes it to the media

KKFI Community Radio (90.1 FM) and NBC Action News (Channel 41) covered the May 25 “Human Care, Not Warfare” midtown rally. Among 12 speakers, Cris Mann urged, “We should cancel college debt and eliminate the warfare budgets.” She led a chant: “Books, not bombs!”

Bennette Dibben puts a “Human Care, Not Warfare” sign on Sharon Hannah’s mask.—Photos by Jim Hannah

CARE-a-vans, rallies seek ‘Human Care, Not Warfare’

A pandemic pivot from funding war and weapons to caring for humanity and Earth—that was the aim of “Human Care, Not Warfare" on Memorial Day, May 25 in Kansas City, Mo. PeaceWorks-KC Board members and leaders from several other groups spoke out and CARE-a-vanned two days before the nation’s death toll from COVID-19 reached 100,000.