A night of beauty, remembering, yearning for peace

Peace before us. Peace behind us. Peace under our feet. Intoning this Navaho Peace Song, Lauren Hall led 70 PeaceWorks members and friends in closing the 2017 Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance. Hall, a member of the PeaceWorks Board, gave us gestures for the song at Loose Park in KC MO. “In the peace and quiet of this … Continue reading A night of beauty, remembering, yearning for peace

Toxic, radioactive waste sites in California, KC, St. Louis, Idaho

Ann Suellentrop spoke at the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance Aug. 6 about nuclear weapons and nuclear energy waste. “Containing and storing the contamination is a huge problem,” she said, announcing a new collaboration among KC and St. Louis activists concerning toxic waste and inviting people to go with her to an Oct. 11-14 meeting of the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability in Idaho.

Hopeful News

Describing the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, Mary Hladky explained at the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance that the treaty prohibits the possession, development, testing, use, and threat of use of nuclear weapons. “The countries supporting this treaty … know that a crisis like the one now growing in North Korea could leap from a spark to an uncontrollable inferno in unanticipated ways.”

Lament and Sorrow. Hope for Tomorrow!

Speaking at the Aug. 6 PeaceWorks gathering to lament the US attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Jim Hannah, in his keynote, said, “I commend you for your presence tonight. You’ve chosen to face into the horrors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki rather than look away, as our nation has mostly done for 72 years. … You are the sign that all have NOT forgotten. You are the sign that hope is stronger than fear. … And you are the voices that collectively will swell to an irresistible global chorus demanding 'No more nukes!'"

Newsletter: June 2017

Take heart! // Become Ambassadors for PeaceWorks KC // Media swarm to rally on Manning's release // Henry Stoever: 'We are instruments of truth.' // Ann Suellentrop: 'Trump calls for billions more for nukes.' // Wife says toxins at old plant caused husband's death // Depleted uranium found at Bannister complex // Is It a Good Job? // Planting Seeds of Peace // Avila will not hold science fair in 2018 with Honeywell

Wife says toxins at old nuke plant caused husband’s death

Debbie Penniston’s husband died at 50 from an inoperable brain cancer after working 27 years as an engineer at the KC Plant, the former nuclear weapons parts plant. During the PeaceWorks Walk/Ride/Die-in on Memorial Day, she asked, “Why didn’t those who knew about the toxins and dangers in this plant tell employees they could run the risk of getting sick or dying, and allow the employees to find employment elsewhere?”