KILLAH CITY

This piece demonstrates how long the damages of combat trauma last and how poverty and being a person of color in this country can be very traumatizing in itself. “I think there is much work to be done here at home when we can easily draw a parallel between an actual combat war zone and cities or neighborhoods in the United States,” reflects C. Garcia. (Her poem contains strong language.)

Newsletter: August 2017

UNplaza Art Fair: Sept. 23-24 // Two documentaries go nuclear, close to home // Hiroshima/Nagasaki commemoration marks 72nd anniversary of bombings // A night of beauty, remembering, yearning for peace // UN treaty advocates nuclear weapons prohibition // Toxic, radioactive waste sites: in KC, St. Louis, Idaho // Sandy Hook mom to speak 10/9 at forum // Remembering Muted Voices

Toxic, radioactive waste sites in California, KC, St. Louis, Idaho

Ann Suellentrop spoke at the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance Aug. 6 about nuclear weapons and nuclear energy waste. “Containing and storing the contamination is a huge problem,” she said, announcing a new collaboration among KC and St. Louis activists concerning toxic waste and inviting people to go with her to an Oct. 11-14 meeting of the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability in Idaho.

Hopeful News

Describing the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, Mary Hladky explained at the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Remembrance that the treaty prohibits the possession, development, testing, use, and threat of use of nuclear weapons. “The countries supporting this treaty … know that a crisis like the one now growing in North Korea could leap from a spark to an uncontrollable inferno in unanticipated ways.”